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Search Results (Refine Search)

Search Parameters:
  • Results Type: Overview
  • Keyword (text search): cpe:2.3:a:python:urllib3:1.1:*:*:*:*:*:*:*
  • CPE Name Search: true
There are 5 matching records.
Displaying matches 1 through 5.
Vuln ID Summary CVSS Severity
CVE-2021-33503

An issue was discovered in urllib3 before 1.26.5. When provided with a URL containing many @ characters in the authority component, the authority regular expression exhibits catastrophic backtracking, causing a denial of service if a URL were passed as a parameter or redirected to via an HTTP redirect.

Published: June 29, 2021; 7:15:07 AM -0400
V3.1: 7.5 HIGH
V2.0: 5.0 MEDIUM
CVE-2020-26137

urllib3 before 1.25.9 allows CRLF injection if the attacker controls the HTTP request method, as demonstrated by inserting CR and LF control characters in the first argument of putrequest(). NOTE: this is similar to CVE-2020-26116.

Published: September 30, 2020; 2:15:26 PM -0400
V3.1: 6.5 MEDIUM
V2.0: 6.4 MEDIUM
CVE-2019-11324

The urllib3 library before 1.24.2 for Python mishandles certain cases where the desired set of CA certificates is different from the OS store of CA certificates, which results in SSL connections succeeding in situations where a verification failure is the correct outcome. This is related to use of the ssl_context, ca_certs, or ca_certs_dir argument.

Published: April 18, 2019; 5:29:00 PM -0400
V3.0: 7.5 HIGH
V2.0: 5.0 MEDIUM
CVE-2019-11236

In the urllib3 library through 1.24.1 for Python, CRLF injection is possible if the attacker controls the request parameter.

Published: April 15, 2019; 11:29:00 AM -0400
V3.0: 6.1 MEDIUM
V2.0: 4.3 MEDIUM
CVE-2018-20060

urllib3 before version 1.23 does not remove the Authorization HTTP header when following a cross-origin redirect (i.e., a redirect that differs in host, port, or scheme). This can allow for credentials in the Authorization header to be exposed to unintended hosts or transmitted in cleartext.

Published: December 11, 2018; 12:29:00 PM -0500
V3.0: 9.8 CRITICAL
V2.0: 5.0 MEDIUM